Word:

intuitionistic logic

(logic, mathematics)intuitionistic logic - Brouwer's foundational theory of mathematics which says that you should not count a proof of (There exists x such that P(x)) valid unless the proof actually gives a method of constructing such an x. Similarly, a proof of (A or B) is valid only if it actually exhibits either a proof of A or a proof of B.

In intuitionism, you cannot in general assert the statement (A or not-A) (the principle of the excluded middle); (A or not-A) is not proven unless you have a proof of A or a proof of not-A. If A happens to be undecidable in your system (some things certainly will be), then there will be no proof of (A or not-A).

This is pretty annoying; some kinds of perfectly healthy-looking examples of proof by contradiction just stop working. Of course, excluded middle is a theorem of classical logic (i.e. non-intuitionistic logic).

History.
Browse
Intrusionist
Intrusive
Intrusive rocks
Intrusive Testing
intrusiveness
Intrust
intubate
Intubation
intuit
Intuition
Intuitional
Intuitionalism
Intuitionalist
Intuitionism
Intuitionist
intuitionist logic
-- intuitionistic logic --
intuitionistic probability
Intuitive
intuitive feeling
Intuitively
Intuitivism
Intumesce
Intumescence
intumescency
Intumescent
Intumulated
Intune
Inturbidate
Inturgescence
Intuse
intussuscept
Intussuscepted
Index: # A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

About this site and copyright information - Online Dictionary Home