Word:

Civil

Civ´il
a.1.Pertaining to a city or state, or to a citizen in his relations to his fellow citizens or to the state; within the city or state.
2.Subject to government; reduced to order; civilized; not barbarous; - said of the community.
England was very rude and barbarous; for it is but even the other day since England grew civil.
- Spenser.
3.Performing the duties of a citizen; obedient to government; - said of an individual.
Civil men come nearer the saints of God than others; they come within a step or two of heaven.
- Preston
4.Having the manners of one dwelling in a city, as opposed to those of savages or rustics; polite; courteous; complaisant; affable.
5.Pertaining to civic life and affairs, in distinction from military, ecclesiastical, or official state.
6.Relating to rights and remedies sought by action or suit distinct from criminal proceedings.
Civil action
an action to enforce the rights or redress the wrongs of an individual, not involving a criminal proceeding.
Civil architecture
the architecture which is employed in constructing buildings for the purposes of civil life, in distinction from military and naval architecture, as private houses, palaces, churches, etc.
Civil death
(Law.) See under Death.
Civil engineering
See under Engineering.
Civil law
See under Law.
Civil list
See under List.
Civil remedy
(Law) that given to a person injured, by action, as opposed to a criminal prosecution.
Civil service
all service rendered to and paid for by the state or nation other than that pertaining to naval or military affairs.
Civil service reform
the substitution of business principles and methods for the spoils system in the conduct of the civil service, esp. in the matter of appointments to office.
Civil state
the whole body of the laity or citizens not included under the military, maritime, and ecclesiastical states.
Civil suit
Same as Civil action.
Civil war
See under War.
Civil year
See under Year.
Adj.1.civil - applying to ordinary citizens; "civil law"; "civil authorities"
2.civil - not rude; marked by satisfactory (or especially minimal) adherence to social usages and sufficient but not noteworthy consideration for others; "even if he didn't like them he should have been civil"- W.S. Maugham
Synonyms: polite
Antonyms:
uncivil, rude - lacking civility or good manners; "want nothing from you but to get away from your uncivil tongue"- Willa Cather
3.civil - of or occurring within the state or between or among citizens of the state; "civil affairs"; "civil strife"; "civil disobediece"; "civil branches of government"
4.civil - of or relating to or befitting citizens as individuals; "civil rights"; "civil liberty"; "civic duties"; "civic pride"
Synonyms: civic
5.civil - (of divisions of time) legally recognized in ordinary affairs of life; "the civil calendar"; "a civil day begins at mean midnight"
Antonyms:
sidereal - (of divisions of time) determined by daily motion of the stars; "sidereal time"
6.civil - of or in a condition of social order; "civil peoples"

CIVIL. This word has various significations. 1. It is used in contradistinction to barbarous or savage, to indicate a state of society reduced to order and regular government; thus we speak of civil life, civil society, civil government, and civil liberty
     2. It is sometimes used in contradistinction to criminal, to indicate the private rights and remedies of men, as members of the community, in contrast to those which are public and relate to the government; thus we speak of civil process and criminal process, civil jurisdiction and criminal jurisdiction.
     3. It is also used in contradistinction to military or ecclesiastical, to natural or foreign; thus we speak of a civil station, as opposed to a military or ecclesiastical station, a civil death as opposed to a natural death; a civil war as opposed to a foreign war. Story on the Const. Sec. 789; 1 Bl. Coin. 6, 125, 251; Montesq. Sp. of Laws, B 1, c. 3; Ruth. Inst. B. 2, c. 2; Id. ch. 3Id. ch. 8, p. 359; Hein. Elem. Jurisp. Nat. B. 2, ch. 6.

LAW, CIVIL. The term civil law is generally applied by way of eminence to the civil or municipal law of the Roman empire, without distinction as to the time when the principles of such law were established or modified. In another sense, the civil law is that collection of laws comprised in the institutes, the code, and the digest of the emperor Justinian, and the novel constitutions of himself and some of his successors. Ersk. Pr. L. Scotl. B. 1, t. l, s. 9; 6 L. R. 494.
     2. The Institutes contain the elements or first principles of the Roman law, in four books. The Digests or Pandects are in fifty books, and contain the opinions and writings of eminent lawyers digested in a systematical method, whose works comprised more than two thousand volumes, The new code, or collection of imperial constitutions, in twelve books; which was a substitute for the code of Theodosius. The novels or new constitutions, posterior in time to the other books, and amounting to a supplement to the code, containing new decrees of successive emperors as new questions happened to arise. These form the body of the Roman law, or corpus juris civilis, as published about the time of Justinian.
     3. Although successful in the west, these laws were not, even in the lifetime of the emperor universally received; and after the Lombard invasion they became so totally neglected, that both the Code and Pandects were lost till the twelfth century, A. D. 1130; when it is said the Pandects were accidentally discovered at Amalphi, and the Code at Ravenna. But, as if fortune would make an atonement for her former severity, they have since been the study of the wisest men, and revered as law, by the politest nations.
     4. By the term civil law is also understood the particular law of each people, opposed to natural law, or the law of nations, which are common to all. Just. Inst. l. 1, t. 1, Sec. 1, 2; Ersk. Pr. L. Scot. B. 1, t. 1, s. 4. In this sense it, is used by Judge Swift. See below.
     5. Civil law is also sometimes understood as that which has emanated from the secular power opposed to the ecclesiastical or military.
     6. Sometimes by the term civil law is meant those laws which relate to civil matters only; and in this sense it is opposed to criminal law, or to those laws which concern criminal matters. Vide Civil.
     7. Judge Swift, in his System of the Laws of Connecticut, prefers the term civil law, to that of municipal law. He considers the term municipal to be too limited in its signification. He defines civil law to be a rule of human action, adopted by mankind in a state of society, or prescribed by the supreme power of the government, requiring a course of conduct not repugnant to morality or religion, productive of the greatest political happiness, and prohibiting actions contrary thereto, and which is enforced by the sanctions of pains and penalties. 1 Sw. Syst. 37. See Ayl. Pand. B. 1, t. 2, p. 6.
     See, in general, as to civil law, Cooper's Justinian the Pandects; 1 Bl. Com. 80, 81; Encyclopedie, art. Droit Civil, Droit Romain; Domat, Les Loix Civiles; Ferriere's Dict.; Brown's Civ. Law; Halifax's Analys. Civ. Law; Wood's Civ. Law; Ayliffe's Pandects; Hein. Elem. Juris.; Erskine's Institutes; Pothier; Eunomus, Dial. 1; Corpus Juris Civilis; Taylor's Elem. Civ. Law.

absolute, accommodating, affable, agreeable, amiable, appropriate, aristocratic, attentive, authoritarian, autocratic, autonomous, becoming, bland, bureaucratic, civic, civilian, civilized, clubbable, clubbish, clubby, common, communal, communicative, companionable, companionate, compatible, complaisant, congenial, congregational, constitutional, cordial, cosmopolitan, courtly, decent, decorous, deferential, democratic, despotic, dictatorial, diplomatic, domestic, fair, fascist, federal, federalist, federalistic, felicitous, fit for society, fitting, fond of society, formal, friendly, general, genial, governmental, graceful, gregarious, gubernatorial, happy, heteronomous, hospitable, internal, international, laic, laical, lay, mannered, mannerly, matriarchal, matriarchic, meet, monarchal, monarchial, monarchic, monocratic, national, nonclerical, nonecclesiastical, nonministerial, nonordained, nonpastoral, nonreligious, obliging, official, oligarchal, oligarchic, parliamentarian, parliamentary, patriarchal, patriarchic, pluralistic, polished, politic, political, popular, proper, refined, republican, right, secular, secularist, secularistic, seemly, self-governing, sociable, social, social-minded, societal, solicitous, state, suave, suitable, supranational, tactful, temporal, theocratic, thoughtful, totalitarian, ungracious, urbane, well-bred, well-mannered
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Civ
Cive
Civet
civet bean
civet cat
Civic
civic center
Civic crown
civic duty
civic leader
civic pride
civic responsibility
civic spirit
Civicism
Civics
civies
-- Civil --
civil action
Civil architecture
civil authority
civil censorship
Civil commotion
civil contempt
civil day
civil death
civil defense
civil disobedience
civil engineer
civil engineering
civil law
civil leader
civil liberty
Civil List
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