Word:

canon

can´on   Pronunciation: kăn´ŭn
n.1.A law or rule.
2.(Eccl.) A law, or rule of doctrine or discipline, enacted by a council and confirmed by the pope or the sovereign; a decision, regulation, code, or constitution made by ecclesiastical authority.
3.The collection of books received as genuine Holy Scriptures, called the sacred canon, or general rule of moral and religious duty, given by inspiration; the Bible; also, any one of the canonical Scriptures. See Canonical books, under Canonical, a.
4.In monasteries, a book containing the rules of a religious order.
5.A catalogue of saints acknowledged and canonized in the Roman Catholic Church.
6.A member of a cathedral chapter; a person who possesses a prebend in a cathedral or collegiate church.
7.(Mus.) A musical composition in which the voices begin one after another, at regular intervals, successively taking up the same subject. It either winds up with a coda (tailpiece), or, as each voice finishes, commences anew, thus forming a perpetual fugue or round. It is the strictest form of imitation. See Imitation.
8.(Print.) The largest size of type having a specific name; - so called from having been used for printing the canons of the church.
9.The part of a bell by which it is suspended; - called also ear and shank.
10.(Billiards) See Carom.
Apostolical canons
See under Apostolical.
Augustinian canons
See under Augustinian.
Canon capitular
a resident member of a cathedral chapter (during a part or the whole of the year).
Canon law
See under Law.
Canon of the Mass
(R. C. Ch.) that part of the mass, following the Sanctus, which never changes.
Honorary canon
a canon{6} who neither lived in a monastery, nor kept the canonical hours.
Minor canon
(Ch. of Eng.) one who has been admitted to a chapter, but has not yet received a prebend.
Regular canon
(R. C. Ch.) one who lived in a conventual community and followed the rule of St. Austin; a Black canon.
Secular canon
(R. C. Ch.) one who did not live in a monastery, but kept the hours.
1.A deep gorge, ravine, or gulch, between high and steep banks, worn by water courses.
Noun1.canon - a rule or especially body of rules or principles generally established as valid and fundamental in a field or art or philosophy; "the neoclassical canon"; "canons of polite society"
2.canon - a priest who is a member of a cathedral chapter
3.canon - a ravine formed by a river in an area with little rainfall
Synonyms: canyon
4.canon - a contrapuntal piece of music in which a melody in one part is imitated exactly in other parts
5.canon - a complete list of saints that have been recognized by the Roman Catholic Church
6.canon - a collection of books accepted as holy scripture especially the books of the Bible recognized by any Christian church as genuine and inspired

CANON, eccl. law. This word is taken from the Greek, and signifies a rule or law. In ecclesiastical law, it is also used to designate an order of religious persons. Francis Duaren says, the reason why the ecclesiastics called the rules they established canons or rules, (canones id est regulas) and not laws, was modesty. They did not dare to call them (leges) laws, lest they should seem to arrogate to themselves the authority of princes and magistrates. De Sacris Ecclesiae Ministeriis, p. 2, in pref. See Law, Canon.

LAW, CANON. The canon law is a body of Roman ecclesiastical law, relative to such matters as that church either has or pretends to have the proper jurisdiction over:
     2. This is compiled from the opinions of the ancient Latin fathers, the decrees of general councils, and the decretal epistles and bulls of the holy see. All which lay in the same confusion and disorder as the Roman civil law, till about the year 1151, when one Gratian, an Italian monk, animated by the discovery of Justinian's Pandects, reduced the ecclesiastical constitutions also into some method, in three books, which he entitled Concordia discordantium canonum, but which are generally known by the name of Decretum Gratiani. These reached as low as the time of Pope Alexander III. The subsequent papal decrees to the pontificate of Gregory IX., were published in much the same method, under the auspices of that pope, about the year 1230, in five books, entitled Decretalia Gregorii noni. A sixth book was added by Boniface VIII., about the year 1298, which is called Sextus decretalium. The Clementine constitution or decrees of Clement V., were in like manner authenticated in 1317, by his successor, John XXII., who also published twenty constitutions of his own, called the Extravagantes Joannis, all of which in some manner answer to the novels of the civil law. To these have since been added some decrees of the later popes, in five books called Extravagantes communes. And all these together, Gratian's Decrees, Gregory's Decretals, the Sixth Decretals, the Clementine Constitutions, and the Extravagants of John and his successors, form the Corpus juris canonici, or body of the Roman canon law. 1 Bl. Com. 82; Encyclopedie, Droit Canonique, Droit Public Ecclesiastique; Dict. de Jurispr. Droit Canonique; Ersk. Pr. L. Scotl. B. 1, t. 1, s. 10. See, in general, Ayl. Par. Jur. Can. Ang.; Shelf. on M. & D. 19; Preface to Burn's Eccl. Law, by Thyrwhitt, 22; Hale's Hist. C. L. 26-29; Bell's Case of a Putative Marriage, 203; Dict. du Droit Canonique; Stair's Inst. b. 1, t. 1, 7.

Bible, Douay Bible, Festschrift, Grand Penitentiary, Holy Father, Holy Scripture, Holy Writ, King James Version, Procrustean law, Revised Standard Version, Revised Version, Scripture, Sefer Torah, Septuagint, Testament, Torah, Torah scroll, Virginal, Vulgate, a belief, abuna, act, album, ana, analects, anthology, antipope, archbishop, archdeacon, archpriest, article of faith, assize, axiom, barometer, beauties, bill, bishop, bishop coadjutor, breviary, bylaw, cardinal, cardinal bishop, cardinal deacon, cardinal priest, catch, chaplain, check, chrestomathy, church book, coadjutor, code, collectanea, collected works, collection, commandment, compilation, complete works, convention, criterion, curate, dean, decree, decretum, degree, delectus, dictate, dictation, dictum, diocesan, doctrine, dogma, ecclesiarch, edict, enactment, euchologion, euchology, exarch, farse, florilegium, flowers, form, formality, formula, formulary, fugato, fugue, garden, garland, gauge, general principle, golden rule, graduated scale, guideline, guiding principle, hierarch, high priest, imperative, institution, jus, law, law of nature, lectionary, legislation, lex, litany, machzor, manual, maxim, measure, metropolitan, miscellanea, miscellany, missal, mitzvah, model, moral, norm, norma, omnibus, order of nature, ordinal, ordinance, ordonnance, papa, parameter, patriarch, pattern, penitentiary, photograph album, pontiff, pontifical, pope, prayer book, prebendary, precept, prelate, prescribed form, prescript, prescription, primate, principium, principle, quantity, quotation book, reading, readout, rector, regulation, ritual, rituale, rondeau, rondelet, rondino, rondo, rondoletto, round, roundelay, rubric, rule, ruling, rural dean, scale, scrapbook, service book, set form, settled principle, siddur, standard, standing order, statute, subdean, suffragan, symposium, teaching, tenet, test, the Book, the Good Book, the Scriptures, the Word, touchstone, troll, type, universal law, value, vicar, working principle, working rule, yardstick
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Cannular
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cannulization
cannulize
Canny
Canoe
canoe birch
canoe cedar
canoeing
canoeist
canoeman
canola oil
-- canon --
Canon bit
Canon bone
Canon capitular
canon law
Canon of the Mass
canoncito
Canoness
canonic
canonical
Canonical books
Canonical Encoding Rules
Canonical epistles
Canonical form
canonical hour
Canonical hours
Canonical letters
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